Thursday, July 24, 2008

Down Under: TV Ads Carbon Offsets

Global Warmists: New Frontiers

In one of those departures from reality so common among Global Warmists, we learn that television advertising has a huge "carbon footprint". Out of Australia, where wombats and moonbats frolic together, we here at DBKP were horrified to learn:

AUSTRALIAN television advertising is producing as much as 57 tonnes of carbon dioxide per hour, and thirty second ad breaks are among the worst offenders, according to audit figures from pitch consultants TrinityP3.

TrinityP3 managing director Darren Woolley said emissions are calculated by measuring a broadcasters’ power consumption and that of a consumer watching an ad on television in their home, B&T Magazine reports.

“We look at the number of households and the number of TVs, and then the proportion of TVs that are plasma, LCD or traditional, and calculate energy consumption based on those factors,” Woolley said."

Now, the curious might ask: why anyone would care about this?

TrinityP3 (Isn't the excess use of the 3 carbon wasteful?) helpfully explains.

"TrinityP3 is formalising a standard carbon footprint measurement of advertising, which it claims will be the first of its kind. "


And my soon-to-be-assembled dog bowl collection will be the first of its kind. So what?

Obviously this useless blather is about an attempt to sell consulting services to idiot advertisers--intent on trying to appease their moronic audiences--by somehow implying that they have balanced their carbon footprint. Most commercials are between 15 and 30 seconds. The programs run 40 minutes to the hour. So if you really wanted to save on energy, keep the advertisements and get rid of the programming.

That should work just fine.

by pat
* Conservation finance
* gawker

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